Ocean Navigator - September-October 2018

A cultural and visual spectacle

For those in search of fair winds, an umbrella-laden beverage and an increased sense of adventure, Cuba provides. U.S.-Cuba relations easing in December of 2014 provided an opportunity for voyagers to sail the island. One year later, we arrived to our charter in the southern Cuba port of Cienfuegos to begin a 600-nm voyage to Havana.

Halfway Rock Light Station

When writing about lighthouses, it’s almost impossible to avoid lapsing into nostalgia or busting out in Faulkner quotes about the past not being dead or Masefield’s lonely sea and the sky.

Volvo Ocean Racers gather data on plastic pollution

Team Turn the Tide on Plastic finished last in the 2017-2018 Volvo Ocean Race, but its crew collected key scientific data during the grueling contest that provides a first-ever look at the scope of the ocean plastic pollution problem.

Cruisers’ Workshop in Pacific NW

Frequent Ocean Navigator contributors Steve D’Antonio and Ralph Naranjo will be putting on a weekend workshop in Bellingham, Wash., for cruisers who want to learn more about a variety of technical skills that will prove invaluable while voyaging.

Understanding overcurrent protection

The engine faltered, and with that a cloud of dense, white smoke erupted from under the small runabout’s dashboard, enveloping the cockpit and its occupants … I vividly recall my first encounter with overcurrent protection, or more accurately the lack thereof.

No turning back

In our seven years of cruising, we have always been moving forward.

A canal transit

Sailing the Caribbean coast of Panama from Bocas del Toro to Colon was routine for John and Lucy Knape.

Innovations in safety

It’s safe to say that sailors dwell on safety equipment like they do fridges and bottom paint — not so much powerboaters, as I learned from my fellow judges at the 2018 Miami Boat Show NMMA Innovation Awards.

High-latitude weather routing

Weather routing experts are a fairly exclusive bunch. It’s a profession that requires not only deep meteorological knowledge but also a knack for translating weather data into useable info for vessels at sea.

Celestial navigation series, part two

In this installment, we’ll discuss how to make our own chart for plotting our celestial navigation data at sea, and we’ll review dead reckoning, plotting, current vectors and compensating for current.

Speed/time/distance sample problems

     Problems 1. If you are traveling a distance of 10 miles and need to get to your destination within 2 hours, how fast would you need to go? 2. If you have been sailing at 6 knots for…

Correcting from compass to true and back again

     Problems 1. Deviation is 8° W on a heading of 090°. A) What would be the magnetic course if you steered 090° by your compass? B) If variation was 12° E, what would be the true course? 2.…