Ocean Navigator - March-April 2020

A cultural and visual spectacle

For those in search of fair winds, an umbrella-laden beverage and an increased sense of adventure, Cuba provides. U.S.-Cuba relations easing in December of 2014 provided an opportunity for voyagers to sail the island. One year later, we arrived to our charter in the southern Cuba port of Cienfuegos to begin a 600-nm voyage to Havana.

Sea Eagle II

As spring approaches and northern-based boaters start thinking about getting their boats out of the barn for launching, it’s likely that few owners will face the issue shown here.

HUGO BOSS race boat undergoes repairs

The IMOCA monohull HUGO BOSS is currently undergoing repairs at Hythe Marine Park in Southampton, U.K., after sustaining that most baffling and bizarre damage of hitting something in the water while mid-ocean.

MIT research buttresses sailors’ knot lore

A team of mathematicians and engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have researched knots and discovered what sailors already knew: Some knots are stronger and more resistant to untying.

Alternatives to ethanol

Most voyagers use diesel engines for their vessel’s auxiliary propulsion. To drive their dinghies and tenders, however, most use gasoline outboards.

Shipshape and Bristol fashion

I have never been a “neat freak,” nor was I very messy in my landlubber life. However, living on board a boat does teach you the advantages to being that bit tidier.

Multisource charging

If there is one thing we all seek when we slip the dock lines and set out for an offshore cruise, it is independence.

Grabbing a mooring ball

Watching someone pick up a mooring ball has always been a source of amusement while sitting at anchor with an afternoon cocktail in hand.

Noon sight problem

You are heading south to Puerto Rico and you want to check your latitude as you approach the coast.

March/April Issue 260: Schooner Adix

Residents of Greenport, N.Y., a small maritime village on the northeast end of Long Island, have been watching all sorts of sailing ships come and go over the past couple hundred years.