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Lunitidal interval

Lunitidal interval

In the small village where I live, I have spread my reputation as someone who knows a thing or two about celestial navigation.

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Solstice

According to my well-thumbed and trusty 2016 Nautical Almanac, the declination of the sun was at its northernmost point at 1400 hours on June 20 when it climbed to 23° 26.1’, and it stayed there — as if resting on a rock after a long climb, catching its breath admiring the view — until June 21, when between 0700 and 0800 it roused itself, shook off the cobwebs and moved south 0.1’.

The first point of Aries

Ah, spring! The peepers peep. The woodpeckers peck. The daffodils dazzle and the redwings are back in town, while on the celestial sphere — the region that we celestial navigators think about — the sun has moved from south of the celestial equator to the north on a day referred to as the vernal equinox.

Navigating with a celestial computer

The reality cannot be avoided: In order to learn anything new and get better at it, effort must be applied.

Using the Rude Star Finder

Everything is easy once you practice. This is certainly true of what seems to be the complicated subject of precalculating available stars for a morning or evening twilight star sight.

A maritime mystery

Any discussions concerning the mysteries of the sea and sailing ships will usually include, at least amongst knowledgeable mariners, passing mention of the disappearance of Mary Celeste.

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