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Celestial navigation series, part six

Celestial navigation series, part six

In this installment, we’ll cover time, time zones and the Nautical Almanac.

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The wandering magnetic pole

The Earth’s Magnetic North Pole, where the lines of magnetic force enter the Earth perpendicular to the globe’s surface, is actually a wandering location.

Celestial navigation series, part four

In this installment, we’ll cover Local Hour Angle (LHA), and determining assumed longitude and assumed latitude. We’ll also look at the spherical trigonometric process for doing sight reduction.

Celestial navigation series, part three

In this installment, we’ll discuss the navigational astronomy of the sun, the celestial sphere, the coordinate system used on the celestial sphere and also the navigational triangle.

Celestial navigation series, part two

In this installment, we’ll discuss how to make our own chart for plotting our celestial navigation data at sea, and we’ll review dead reckoning, plotting, current vectors and compensating for current.

Celestial navigation series, part one

We’re revisiting this series on navigating by the sun, moon, stars and planets in the age of GPS because celestial nav is not only a viable backup to satellite navigation, but it is also a skill that ocean voyagers should have in their toolkit.

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