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Fewer hurricanes in eastern Pacific

Aug 30, 2007 West Coast racer and voyager Chuck Warren just forwarded to me an interesting bit of information about hurricanes in the eastern Pacific. Turns out there were less of them than normal. Not sure what that means for the climatological future, but at least some boatowners didn't have to spend long nights worrying about their vessels.

From the National Hurricane Center website:
 
FOR THE EASTERN NORTH PACIFIC...EAST OF 140 DEGREES WEST LONGITUDE..

TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN WAS BELOW
AVERAGE FOR JULY. HURRICANE COSME...TROPICAL STORM DALILA...AND
TROPICAL STORM ERICK FORMED IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC DURING THE
MONTH. IN COMPARISON...THE AVERAGE JULY HAS ABOUT FOUR TROPICAL
STORMS...TWO OF WHICH BECOME HURRICANES. TROPICAL DEPRESSIONS
FOUR-E AND FIVE-E ALSO DEVELOPED DURING THE MONTH.

SO FAR IN 2007...THERE HAVE BEEN A TOTAL OF 5 TROPICAL STORMS...1
HURRICANE...AND NO MAJOR HURRICANES. THESE TOTALS ARE WELL BELOW
THE CLIMATOLOGICAL AVERAGE OF 6.2 TROPICAL STORMS... 3.0 HURRICANES
AND 1.5 MAJOR HURRICANES BY THE END OF JULY. IN FACT...IN TERMS OF
ACCUMULATED CYCLONE ENERGY (ACE)...THIS IS THE THIRD QUIETEST
YEAR-TO-DATE (BEHIND 2005 AND 1966) SINCE THE GEOSTATIONARY
SATELLITE ERA BEGAN IN 1966.